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Commissions explain storm readiness plans

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CNY/NNY/S. Tier: Commissions explain storm readiness plans
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Governor Cuomo says he's heard enough discussion and now wants action from Washington when it comes to Sandy relief. Thursday, Cuomo heard recommendations from his emergency preparedness and response commissions. Zack Fink was there and has more.

ALBANY, N.Y. -- Although Republican House leaders have now promised to hold a vote on $60 billion in Sandy relief, Governor Andrew Cuomo indicated he is still not ready to take them at their word. Reaching back in time, the governor referenced the 1996 film "Jerry Maguire" to make his point.

Cuomo said, "I am at the point where it is simple for me: Show me the money. Because I have heard a lot of things and until I see the cash, I am going to withhold judgment because many of the things that have been said never happened."

After Hurricane Sandy tore through New York City in October, Governor Cuomo created four commissions to study how the state can better prepare for a disaster. Cuomo heard the findings of two of them: The New York State Ready Commission and the New York State Respond Commission.

"Superstorm Sandy created one of the greatest operational challenges that this state has ever seen," said New York State Homeland Security chief Jerome Hauer.

Among the recommendations are that the state establish an emergency stockpile of supplies, create a text message alert system that provides localized information, update the building code, so new buildings are able to withstand major weather events and create a strategic fuel reserve.

Fuel shortages dragged on for two weeks due to disruptions in the supply chain. Cuomo wants the governor's office to control gas rationing. New Jersey established a statewide rationing system.

"New York City puts in a gas rationing plan on its own it creates mayhem in the neighboring counties. You can't get gas in New York City, you deluge Queens and you deluge Westchester," Cuomo said.

The governor wants to build on some of these recommendations in his State of the State Address next week. He will also incorporate the findings of a special commission he created, which is looking specifically at how the utilities performed and prepared.

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